MEP FI 319

Circuit Break Podcast #319

Work to Automate the Work

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Tour MacroFab's ITAR-Compliant Facility

March 9, 2022, Episode #319

On this episode, Parker discusses his current adventure in testing and qualifying ratcheting wrenches and Stephen finally learns the magic of python!

MacroFab Updates

  • KiCad 6 support!
  • PI DAY Contest
    • March 14th (3/14)
    • Stop by the MacroFab website to take a pop quiz for a chance to win some free pizza

Testing Ratchet Wrenches

  • Wrench qualifications
    • Ratcheting Wrench
    • Non-Reversible
    • Zero-degree offset
    • ½” hex 
    • 12 or 6 point
  • Have collected 20 ratchet wrenches so far
  • Why? Broke one and wanted to try out all the different styles and brands before buying a set
  • What are we testing?
    • Thickness of the wrench
    • How does it feel?
    • Max torque to either failure or cam out
    • Any other tests?
      • Thickness to torque rating
      • How much mechanism play
      • Measure ratchet dimension 
  • How?
    • Quick tests show I need more than 100ftlbs but less than 250ftlbs of bolt torque
    • Load cells to measure the clamping force between 2 plates
    • Need a “screw” drive to handle the force
    • A normal ½” bolt is usually 5/16-18” which handles ~30ftlbs before pulling the threads
    • Two Paths
      • Take a ¾” bolt and machine the head into a hex
      • Take a ½” allen socket with a ¾” square drive and attach that to a bolt

Automate the Boring Stuff

  • Spending 20 hours to save 1 – the engineers life
  • Making API calls with the requests library
  • Requests: HTTP for Humans
  • Openpyxl for creating excel
  • Commenting code
  • Automate the Boring Stuff

About the Hosts

Parker Dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig is a component engineer working in the aerospace industry. He has applied his electrical engineering knowledge in a variety of contexts previously, including oil and gas, contract manufacturing, audio electronic repair, and synthesizer design. A graduate of Texas A&M, Stephen has lived his adult life in the Houston, TX, and Denver, CO, areas.

Stephen has never said no to a project. From building guitar amps (starting when he was 17) to designing and building his own CNC table to fine-tuning the mineral composition of the water he uses to brew beer, he thrives on testing, experimentation, and problem-solving. Tune into the podcast to learn more about the wacky stuff Stephen gets up to.

Special thanks to whixr over at Tymkrs for the intro and outro!

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