Making money the hard way

Circuit Break Podcast #370

Making Money the Hard Way

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Removing the Waterworld from Product Development

Mike Geyer of Fictiv joins Parker and Stephen to discuss the State of Hardware Report, Tariff Engineering, the Production Gap, and Lean Manufacturing.

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Tour MacroFab's ITAR-Compliant Facility

March 17, 2023, Episode #370

The US Mint Denver produces 30 million coins a day. Denes, the tooling department manager, discusses with us how production at this scale functions.

Denes Szabo

Denes was born and raised in Colorado. His parents owned a machine shop where Denes worked from a young age till 50. Denes now runs the tooling department at the US Mint Denver.

Topics

  • What is the process of getting US currency made?
    • Making changes and updates?
    • How does this differ from other currencies?
  • What goes into creating the tooling?
    • Materials
    • Files for creating the tools
    • How are they approved
  • Quality controls on currency manufacturing
  • Producing at scale
  • Inventory and Logistics

About the Hosts

Parker dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig began his electronics career by building musical oriented circuits in 2003. Stephen is an avid guitar player and, in his down time, manufactures audio electronics including guitar amplifiers, pedals, and pro audio gear. Stephen graduated with a BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University.

Special thanks to whixr over at Tymkrs for the intro and outro!

Related Podcasts

Removing the waterworld from product development

Removing the Waterworld from Product Development

Mike Geyer of Fictiv joins Parker and Stephen to discuss the State of Hardware Report, Tariff Engineering, the Production Gap, and Lean Manufacturing.