Discrete atomic luffa control

Circuit Break Podcast #153

Discrete Atomic Luffa Control

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January 2, 2019, Episode #153

Ben and Chris come on the podcast to talk about the latest in 3D printing and humble luffas.
  • Benjamin Heckendorn
    • An electronics hacking entertainment guru
    • Former host of Element 14’s “ The Ben Heck Show”.
  • Chris Kraft
    • A tinkerer currently working as a software engineer in the financial services industry
    • Extensive background in 3d printing and building anything that seems interesting
  • Past two years
  • Hangprinter
    • A very simplified explanation is you take a delta printer but instead of having the three motors that are attached to the side frame you instead locate those motors wherever and have wires/cables/etc that run up to points that you mount
    • Some videos that show how it works
    • The first new/interesting thing Chris has seen in awhile
    • Project is open source so people are free to contribute and find ways to improve the design
    • One thing I feel is potentially a missed opportunity is the focus is on making it cheap
  • ODrive
    • Designed to give motor control to hobby grade brushless DC motors instead of stepper motors
    • Hackaday.io project
  • New Makerbot printer named “Method”
    • Non-heated bed is a “feature”?
    • Latest design seems to prefer technologies that Stratesys can or already has patented
  • Consider the humble Luffa
    • For a long time manufacturing has mostly used subtractive techniques
    • Until recently most manufacturing was about taking raw materials and cutting, bending, etc into the desired pattern
    • Look at that infill
    • Additive manufacturing is really different when you think about the possibilities
    • What if we could use CRISPR to “reprogram” plants to produce other things? Like growing a replacement organs, body parts or something else completely?

Visit our Public Slack Channel and join the conversation in between episodes!

Benjamin Heckendorn

Benjamin Heckendorn

Chris Kraft

Chris Kraft

About the Hosts

Parker dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig began his electronics career by building musical oriented circuits in 2003. Stephen is an avid guitar player and, in his down time, manufactures audio electronics including guitar amplifiers, pedals, and pro audio gear. Stephen graduated with a BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University.

Special thanks to whixr over at Tymkrs for the intro and outro!

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