Chips cant dip

Circuit Break Podcast #388

CHIPS Can’t Dip

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July 28, 2023, Episode #388

This week we’re joined by David Schild, the Executive Director of the Printed Circuit Board Association of America (PCBAA). PCBAA is a consortium of American companies supporting domestic production of printed circuit boards and the materials they are made of. An established leader and trusted advocate, Schild has over 20 years of experience managing political involvement, corporate public relations and public policy efforts for the aerospace and defense industry and advocates for the CHIPS Act and PCBS Act.

Guests:

  • David Schild from the PCBAA

Intro to U.S. public policy impacting the microelectronic industry

  • The impact of globalization, corporate consolidation, and reshoring
  • The CHIPS Act as a model and way forward to avoid supply chain issues
  • Bringing manufacturing ecosystems back to America
  • The CHIPS Act’s $52 billion endowment with tax credits to motivate companies to create in America

How far can American manufacturing subsidies really go?

  • “Private money follows public action”
  • We’re down to single points of failure; one thing goes down, everything goes down worldwide
  • Engineers don’t often get elected to Congress
  • Fostering options for young Americans to follow career paths via local microelectronics
  • “The things we make in America, we can invent in America”

Summary/Takeaways:

  • Making PCBs relatable to the general public and politicians is crucial
  • The CHIPS and PCBs acts are a good start, but not enough

About the Hosts

Parker Dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig is a component engineer working in the aerospace industry. He has applied his electrical engineering knowledge in a variety of contexts previously, including oil and gas, contract manufacturing, audio electronic repair, and synthesizer design. A graduate of Texas A&M, Stephen has lived his adult life in the Houston, TX, and Denver, CO, areas.

Stephen has never said no to a project. From building guitar amps (starting when he was 17) to designing and building his own CNC table to fine-tuning the mineral composition of the water he uses to brew beer, he thrives on testing, experimentation, and problem-solving. Tune into the podcast to learn more about the wacky stuff Stephen gets up to.

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