Zero sum resistor arrays

Circuit Break Podcast #45

Zero Sum Resistor Arrays

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December 9, 2016, Episode #45

On this episode, Stephen and Parker continue on the Jeep Bluetooth mod and ask about zero ohm resistors.
  • Parker has a new update to the Jeep Bluetooth Radio Mod. To level shift the Bluetooth audio to what the TDA7340S expects, Parker is going to build a differential opamp. The Bluetooth audio adapter has a 50mV DC offset and a 1.9V Pk-Pk at max volume where the TDA7429L is expecting a 4.65V DC offset with a 800mV Pk-Pk. See Figure 1.
  • Stephen has a crazy idea to make the “ultimate” inexpensive resistor standard. His plan is to use a big array of resistors that are in parallel/series. He hopes that statistically it will swamp out the tolerance. Stephen will use different manufactures to swamp out batch issues. Next week we should have some analysis on this project done.
  • Analog-EETimes article: Why the zero-ohm resistor?
  • NASA Wants SpacePoop Hackers. Reminds Parker of this Apollo 10 radio transcription. See page 416.
  • New Bluetooth 5 spec is out. Key updates to Bluetooth 5 include longer range, faster speed, and larger broadcast message capacity.
  • Samsung exploding battery update.
Opamp audio level shifter

About the Hosts

Parker Dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig is a component engineer working in the aerospace industry. He has applied his electrical engineering knowledge in a variety of contexts previously, including oil and gas, contract manufacturing, audio electronic repair, and synthesizer design. A graduate of Texas A&M, Stephen has lived his adult life in the Houston, TX, and Denver, CO, areas.

Stephen has never said no to a project. From building guitar amps (starting when he was 17) to designing and building his own CNC table to fine-tuning the mineral composition of the water he uses to brew beer, he thrives on testing, experimentation, and problem-solving. Tune into the podcast to learn more about the wacky stuff Stephen gets up to.

Special thanks to whixr over at Tymkrs for the intro and outro!

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