Letting loaf

Circuit Break Podcast #124

Letting The Loaf Out

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June 13, 2018, Episode #124

Parker breaks down a Ford Climate Controlled Seat Module and Stephen has scope creep in his uTracer project.
  • Parker
    • MAX6682 breakout board to read the thermistors
    • Engineer Spotlight on All About Circuits
    • Ford Climate Controlled Seat Module Breakdown
      • Peltier setup
      • Temperature feedback is via thermistor
        • 54K to 240K with the resistance around 170K at room temp
        • Possibly a NTC 200K?
      • Fan uses a LB11988HR from OnSemi
        • 3 Wire
        • Interesting setup to control the speed of the fan
        • What part is Dpak with marking 065886A
  • Stephen
    • The uTracer 3 design update
      • Full on scope creep
      • Adding a STM32 mcu to control the relays to make it “safe”
  • Rapid Fire Opinion – RFO
    • Digital circuits: Now with more analog!
      • Using memristors as data storage devices
      • Two memristors into the output totem-pole of a classic CMOS converter, between the usual p-mosfet and n-mosfet – effectively adding a potentiometer, whose wiper is the inverter output
      • Buy memristors?
    • Interviewing engineers? Should you bring your project or not?

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Fan module from a 2015 Ford F-150.

Fan module from a 2015 Ford F-150.

The Fan PCB. Single layer on aluminum substrate.

The Fan PCB. Single layer on aluminum substrate.

Power input schematic of the fan controller.

Power input schematic of the fan controller.

About the Hosts

Parker dillmann
  Parker Dillmann

Parker is an Electrical Engineer with backgrounds in Embedded System Design and Digital Signal Processing. He got his start in 2005 by hacking Nintendo consoles into portable gaming units. The following year he designed and produced an Atari 2600 video mod to allow the Atari to display a crisp, RF fuzz free picture on newer TVs. Over a thousand Atari video mods where produced by Parker from 2006 to 2011 and the mod is still made by other enthusiasts in the Atari community.

In 2006, Parker enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin as a Petroleum Engineer. After realizing electronics was his passion he switched majors in 2007 to Electrical and Computer Engineering. Following his previous background in making the Atari 2600 video mod, Parker decided to take more board layout classes and circuit design classes. Other areas of study include robotics, microcontroller theory and design, FPGA development with VHDL and Verilog, and image and signal processing with DSPs. In 2010, Parker won a Ti sponsored Launchpad programming and design contest that was held by the IEEE CS chapter at the University. Parker graduated with a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Spring of 2012.

In the Summer of 2012, Parker was hired on as an Electrical Engineer at Dynamic Perception to design and prototype new electronic products. Here, Parker learned about full product development cycles and honed his board layout skills. Seeing the difficulties in managing operations and FCC/CE compliance testing, Parker thought there had to be a better way for small electronic companies to get their product out in customer's hands.

Parker also runs the blog, longhornengineer.com, where he posts his personal projects, technical guides, and appnotes about board layout design and components.

Stephen Kraig
  Stephen Kraig

Stephen Kraig is a component engineer working in the aerospace industry. He has applied his electrical engineering knowledge in a variety of contexts previously, including oil and gas, contract manufacturing, audio electronic repair, and synthesizer design. A graduate of Texas A&M, Stephen has lived his adult life in the Houston, TX, and Denver, CO, areas.

Stephen has never said no to a project. From building guitar amps (starting when he was 17) to designing and building his own CNC table to fine-tuning the mineral composition of the water he uses to brew beer, he thrives on testing, experimentation, and problem-solving. Tune into the podcast to learn more about the wacky stuff Stephen gets up to.

Special thanks to whixr over at Tymkrs for the intro and outro!

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